Highest house number within London

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BigBazz
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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by BigBazz » Thu Dec 02, 2021 23:51

Was92now625 wrote:
Thu Dec 02, 2021 19:45
I remember seeing a house in Arbroath with number 47 1/2 (forty seven and a half).
In a similar vein, London Councils (formerly the Association of London Government) is based at 59½ Southwark Street, London, SE1 0AL. (Shown as "59 & A Half" on the Royal Mail Postcode Finder).

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RichardA626
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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by RichardA626 » Fri Dec 03, 2021 14:08

In Marple there is a street where the lowest even numbered house is 2A, though it looks like it was built at the same time as the others.

Did someone assign the numbers based on the plot numbers, then they realised they could squeeze another house on the land?

In my current job I deal with the paperwork for new houses, often they had a provisional address that it totally different to the one eventually assigned. Often the company starts dealing with the sale before the houses are completed, so the database only has the provisional address. Sometimes I have to look up things with the customer name rather than address.
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jnty
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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by jnty » Fri Dec 03, 2021 14:13

In Edinburgh flats are often numbered something like 20 2F2 (building 20, 2nd flat, 2nd floor) on the electoral roll but 20/4 in the post office database. This causes endless fun getting credit reports and proving your address - try opening a bank account when your council tax bill says 20 2F2 but they'll only issue an account to 20/4. That's before you even get to the websites that don't allow slashes in addresses - so you end up at 20 4. The problems this can cause are obvious.

This is an extremely widespread and well known problem, but can only be fixed on an individual basis with lots of paperwork. I just moved to a main door flat...

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trickstat
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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by trickstat » Fri Dec 03, 2021 14:17

RichardA626 wrote:
Fri Dec 03, 2021 14:08
In Marple there is a street where the lowest even numbered house is 2A, though it looks like it was built at the same time as the others.

Did someone assign the numbers based on the plot numbers, then they realised they could squeeze another house on the land?
Sounds plausible in theory, but getting planning permission for an extra house might be difficult. Apparently, many developers deliberately apply for permission to build a few more houses than they think they will be allowed to build so that they get permission for enough to get the return they are looking for.

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by Vierwielen » Fri Dec 03, 2021 17:43

My brother, who lives on a two hectare smallholding on the outskirts of Perth (W.Australia). His main frontage is about 200 metres and his address is 479 XXX Road and his neighbour's address in 459 XXX Road. I checekd on Google Maps and found that his property is about 4.79 km from the start of XXX Road which suggest to me that the authories allocate numbers based on the offset from the start of the road in untis of 20 metres (even numbers one side and odd numbers on the other side). I have seen a similar use of proeprty addresses in Italy.

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by jgharston » Sat Dec 04, 2021 19:07

Was92now625 wrote:
Thu Dec 02, 2021 22:24
doebag wrote:
Thu Dec 02, 2021 20:11
I'd agre totally with that. If a small row of terraced houses are built on a plot where a single house stood, they get numbered 1A/1B/1C etc. It should be the same if the existing house is divided up.
Who decides ? If it is the authorities, there SHOULD be a measure of consistency. If it is the individuals, I'd not expect much consistency.
There's a road in Whitby that is odds'n'evens. Somebody built a house between number 64 and number 66. They decided to number it number 65.

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by jgharston » Sat Dec 04, 2021 19:16

jnty wrote:
Fri Dec 03, 2021 14:13
In Edinburgh flats are often numbered something like 20 2F2 (building 20, 2nd flat, 2nd floor) on the electoral roll but 20/4 in the post office database. This causes endless fun getting credit reports and proving your address - try opening a bank account when your council tax bill says 20 2F2 but they'll only issue an account to 20/4. That's before you even get to the websites that don't allow slashes in addresses - so you end up at 20 4. The problems this can cause are obvious.
My address is 6 Rear XXXX. But the council insist I am Flat 2, 6 XXXX. Flat 1 does not exist, I do not face XXXX, (edit: 6 XXXX is a completely different property blocking me off from XXXX) I have no access to XXXX, my flat is on Rear XXXX - a common situation in Whitby, and in the rest of the borough.

We also have a handful of streets where each side has a different name. The north side of John Street is Normanby Terrace, the south side of South Terrace is Crescent Place, I live at 6 Rear XXXX facing 4 YYYY.

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by Lonewolf » Mon Dec 06, 2021 07:56

I dunno about the UK, but when my parents lived in the USA, their address was well into 5 figures :shock: I can't remember it exactly but it was something like 10,456 :roll:

As for internet and addresses the internet hates my address. In my village theres no numbers, just house names. So addresses go like this...

Wolf View
Gas Street
Village
North Yorkshire

Which would be fine if it didn't just so happen that I live in a semi which has just the one name so to differentiate the two halves we have 1 Wolf View and 2 Wolf View so my address looks like this

1 Wolf View (Looks like a house number and road name but is actually the house name)
Gas Street
Village
North Yorkshire

The number of times I have to explain this grrr :roll: :roll: :roll:
Wolfie

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by avtur » Mon Dec 06, 2021 08:46

When we lived in the US our house number was 20955, our house was the last on a 300 metre long cul-de-sac on which there were a total of 23 houses, the lowest number was 20927, so there were 5 numbers missing. We never did find out the reasoning behind the numbers.

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by doebag » Mon Dec 06, 2021 09:04

As I understand it, the US numbers in blocks.100's or 1000's

So the 100 block may only have 50 houses in it but the next block will restart at 200.

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the cheesecake man
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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by the cheesecake man » Mon Dec 06, 2021 13:46

Once upon a time I lived on this street where the evens start at 26. To be fair there was space for 2-24 but I guess they just never happened.

If you want strange numbering (OK not actually houses but the same principle) I can offer my secondary school which had rooms 1-27 on the ground flor and 101-140 on the first floor, plus 10A,11A, 22A and 22B inserted in the obvious places. Plus a room between 123 and 124 called .... 67 :confused:

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by doebag » Mon Dec 06, 2021 16:48

The block numbering system at Heathrow Airport did not develop too well.
It would have started out quite logically with the runways separated in blocks and the taxiways likewise with for example 55 inner and 55 outer.

But as runways were extended or closed, and some of the original taxiways built on the whole system was a nightmare to learn It's a long time since I had to use it.

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by trickstat » Mon Dec 06, 2021 21:01

the cheesecake man wrote:
Mon Dec 06, 2021 13:46
Once upon a time I lived on this street where the evens start at 26. To be fair there was space for 2-24 but I guess they just never happened.

If you want strange numbering (OK not actually houses but the same principle) I can offer my secondary school which had rooms 1-27 on the ground flor and 101-140 on the first floor, plus 10A,11A, 22A and 22B inserted in the obvious places. Plus a room between 123 and 124 called .... 67 :confused:
The odd numbers on the road I grew up in jumped from (I think) 157 to 177. The missing numbers were to be used for some flats that were then not built.

With the exception of 67, that school room numbering system tends to match that of most large hotels.

The large office I used to work in occupied 3 of 4 conjoined blocks around a car park, built at different times. The 2 biggest blocks had main rooms that were numbered x55 in one block and x80 in the other. With x being the floor number (0=ground floor).

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by RichardA626 » Mon Dec 06, 2021 22:19

My secondary school had a mostly logical system with the Bradshaw building having 3 figure room numbers starting with 0-3 & Isherwood 4-9.

For some reason one of the mobile classrooms next to the Bradshaw building had the number 992, much higher than the ones next to the ones next to Isherwood. Logically it would have been in the 100s which was the ground floor numbers. As the school was built on a hillside the Bradshaw building had a lower ground floor on one side which began with 0.
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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by Vierwielen » Mon Dec 06, 2021 22:40

I recall that at UMIST, many (maybe most) of the buildings had "A", "B", "C" floors etc and the room numbers were A001, A002 ... etc. (None of the buildings got up to 26 floors though).

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by Vierwielen » Mon Dec 06, 2021 22:44

I recall that at UMIST, many (maybe most) of the buildings had "A", "B", "C" floors etc and the room numbers were A001, A002 ... etc. (None of the buildings got up to 26 floors though).

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by jgharston » Tue Dec 07, 2021 02:42

My university hall of residence used the <floor><room> numbering system, so my room was 418 Murray Hall. But as the hall was built into a hillside, floor 3 was actually the "ground" floor. :)

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by Chris5156 » Tue Dec 07, 2021 22:34

At work we have floor based numbering, so room 3045 is on the third floor (and the second digit places it in zone 0 of that floor).

The system uses the prefixes G, L and B for Ground, Lower Ground and Basement.

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by Hugo Nebula » Thu Dec 09, 2021 20:43

Piatkow wrote:
c2R wrote:
Tue Jul 13, 2021 23:33
Glen wrote:
Tue Jul 13, 2021 23:21
And more "stupid places to change a road name", one I found when looking for addresses there last year.
Now that is a good topic...

Apton Road, Bishops Stortford manages to escape termination at a roundabout and continue in a different direction... it then continues past cemetary road and then becomes Scott Road, half way between Cemetary Road and Fairlands... it simply doesn't make any sense.

https://www.sabre-roads.org.uk/maps/ind ... 18&layer=0
You need to verify things like that on the ground or with StreetView. Shifting the point where street names change is one of the copyright traps they put on maps.

Looking at an ABC map I was thoroughly confused as I couldn't pick the site of the house were I spent my earliest years. A quick virtual journey on Google checking the street name plates showed that the names changed at a crossroad not at the illogical point that the map showed.
Road names change at a boundary because of why they are named. Cases such as Stockport Road in Manchester are roads that went _to_ that named place. You can often tell where a district/ village/ town/ city boundary is by where it becomes the name of the place you're coming from.

Numbers on such a road start closest to that centre, with the odds on the left as you're leaving town.

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Re: Highest house number within London

Post by Vierwielen » Thu Dec 09, 2021 21:37

Hugo Nebula wrote:
Thu Dec 09, 2021 20:43
Piatkow wrote:
c2R wrote:
Tue Jul 13, 2021 23:33


Now that is a good topic...

Apton Road, Bishops Stortford manages to escape termination at a roundabout and continue in a different direction... it then continues past cemetary road and then becomes Scott Road, half way between Cemetary Road and Fairlands... it simply doesn't make any sense.

https://www.sabre-roads.org.uk/maps/ind ... 18&layer=0
You need to verify things like that on the ground or with StreetView. Shifting the point where street names change is one of the copyright traps they put on maps.

Looking at an ABC map I was thoroughly confused as I couldn't pick the site of the house were I spent my earliest years. A quick virtual journey on Google checking the street name plates showed that the names changed at a crossroad not at the illogical point that the map showed.
Road names change at a boundary because of why they are named. Cases such as Stockport Road in Manchester are roads that went _to_ that named place. You can often tell where a district/ village/ town/ city boundary is by where it becomes the name of the place you're coming from.

Numbers on such a road start closest to that centre, with the odds on the left as you're leaving town.

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Here is a good example, taken in the Netherlands, of No 1 being at the end of a road, but in the middle of the town. Unfortunately I could not get an imager of the No 1 on the continuation of this road (in the vicinity of the roadworks), as the Germans would not allow the Google cars to operate in Germany.

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