Double Stop

Discussion about street lighting, road signs, traffic signals - and all other street furniture - goes here.

Moderator: Site Management Team

Post Reply
jervi
Member
Posts: 825
Joined: Thu Aug 17, 2017 16:29
Location: Haywards Heath

Double Stop

Post by jervi » Sat Oct 17, 2020 11:32

Saw this yesterday
https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.33992 ... 312!8i6656
Very strange combination of road markings that I don't feel are enforceable.

User avatar
JohnnyMo
Member
Posts: 5204
Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2003 13:56
Location: Letchworth, Herts, England

Re: Double Stop

Post by JohnnyMo » Sat Oct 17, 2020 12:51

Probably are enforceable esp the mandatory stops from Grange Lane, and joining the High St. Where there is ambiguity would be if if there was a crash between a car from Grange Lane & another from Church Lane.
Johnny Mo

User avatar
Vierwielen
Member
Posts: 3722
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2008 21:21
Location: Hampshire

Re: Double Stop

Post by Vierwielen » Sat Oct 17, 2020 22:31

An extension to this type of scheme is the "4-way stop" which is common in South Africa and I believe, in the States. The rule in South Africa is that you have to stop and then the first person to have stopped proceeds. When my aunt came out from the UK for a visit to SA, the roads in this picture were all single lane and she was most astonished when my father came to a total halt at the "stop" sign even though there was no other vehicle in sight.

Of course, a roundabout could easily have been built here (plenty of land), but that might require a little too much intelligence on the part of either the Apartheid-era government or the post-Apartheid government.

User avatar
Chris5156
Member
Posts: 14225
Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2001 21:50
Location: London
Contact:

Re: Double Stop

Post by Chris5156 » Sun Oct 18, 2020 00:55

Vierwielen wrote:
Sat Oct 17, 2020 22:31
An extension to this type of scheme is the "4-way stop" which is common in South Africa and I believe, in the States. The rule in South Africa is that you have to stop and then the first person to have stopped proceeds. When my aunt came out from the UK for a visit to SA, the roads in this picture were all single lane and she was most astonished when my father came to a total halt at the "stop" sign even though there was no other vehicle in sight.

Of course, a roundabout could easily have been built here (plenty of land), but that might require a little too much intelligence on the part of either the Apartheid-era government or the post-Apartheid government.
Looking around the junction, I see lots of signs on the approach that say "HIGH ACCIDENT ZONE". I'm not at all surprised! What a ridiculous way to control a junction with multiple lanes on all approaches.

WHBM
Member
Posts: 7776
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 18:01
Location: London

Re: Double Stop

Post by WHBM » Sun Oct 18, 2020 12:35

To me many US Stop signs require a double stop anyway, as they set the stop line too far back. Hence my common expression when I am over there, "once to comply" [at the stop line] "and once for visibility" [when I can actually see up and down the main road].

User avatar
Vierwielen
Member
Posts: 3722
Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2008 21:21
Location: Hampshire

Re: Double Stop

Post by Vierwielen » Mon Oct 19, 2020 21:35

Chris5156 wrote:
Sun Oct 18, 2020 00:55
Vierwielen wrote:
Sat Oct 17, 2020 22:31
An extension to this type of scheme is the "4-way stop" which is common in South Africa and I believe, in the States. The rule in South Africa is that you have to stop and then the first person to have stopped proceeds. When my aunt came out from the UK for a visit to SA, the roads in this picture were all single lane and she was most astonished when my father came to a total halt at the "stop" sign even though there was no other vehicle in sight.

Of course, a roundabout could easily have been built here (plenty of land), but that might require a little too much intelligence on the part of either the Apartheid-era government or the post-Apartheid government.
Looking around the junction, I see lots of signs on the approach that say "HIGH ACCIDENT ZONE". I'm not at all surprised! What a ridiculous way to control a junction with multiple lanes on all approaches.
There is more than enough land to put a roundabout twice the size to the M40 J1 roundabout. They would not put traffic lights there because there seems ot be an aversion in South Africa to having automated safety features. As an example, at the level crossing close to where my parents lived a man was employed to sit there all day with a red flag to stop traffic when a train came (maybe once an hour). Eventually it became too expensive to keep him on, so it became an unguarded level crossing, well sign-posted with clear visibility in both directions (provided that you stopped). In the UK that woudl have been an ideal candidate for a controlled level crossing, but afte a few fatal accidents, the South Africans built a flyover (which coud not develop mechanical problems).

Post Reply