Towns changing names

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Bertiebus
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Re: Towns changing names

Post by Bertiebus » Thu Apr 19, 2018 23:51

trickstat wrote:
Bertiebus wrote: I know someone who says they live in St. Evenage. Ironically, I also happen to know someone who claims to be from St. Reatham in south London.
Quite a lot of people say St. Evenage but in my experience only as a kind of in joke.
I never said it was serious!

Bfivethousand
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Re: Towns changing names

Post by Bfivethousand » Wed May 09, 2018 13:50

Every day's a schoolday... In keeping with many other Midlands towns adopting a French influence within their names, there used to be a town called Beaurepaire in Derbyshire.

Actually there still is, only nowadays it's known as Belper.
Now to be known as Bfiveeightsix

Piatkow
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Re: Towns changing names

Post by Piatkow » Wed May 09, 2018 22:08

rileyrob wrote:
Sun Dec 03, 2017 17:38
trickstat wrote:Despite living my whole life nearer to the other two places, it is Burnham-On-Sea that I think of first if I hear "Burnham" without any other context. This is because I went on holiday there a number of times as a child.
You poor soul, you have my sympathy :D Mind, you I went on holiday to Hertfordshire several times (to see my Grandparents), so not every holiday destination is exotic!!
We used to stay with my mother's sister at Varteg in the South Wales Coalfield. Actually a great jumping off place for the Beacons. It hasn't had a name change but it took a local campaign to stop the council switching the signage to Welsh orthography. Just up the valley Blaenavon seems to be resisting as well.

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Bryn666
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Re: Towns changing names

Post by Bryn666 » Mon Jun 18, 2018 16:41

You can appreciate why in the case of Varteg though - they'll become a laughing stock, plus sign theft and vandalism will become a serious issue.

Blaenafon is harder to argue against other than "is it really even necessary" - but this counts especially given the UNESCO status of the area and it being well established as Blaenavon.
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Chris Bertram
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Re: Towns changing names

Post by Chris Bertram » Mon Jun 18, 2018 16:54

The town that I grew up knowing as Seaham Harbour has lost its "Harbour" and is now simply "Seaham". But the harbour is still there, now doing business out of leisure sailing rather than coal transit. Inland, on the old A19, now B1285, there used to be an area called "New Seaham", but this seems to have disappeared from maps altogether. It was the area just south of Seaham Colliery, and would be between B1404 and B1287 today, not including the estate known as "Deneside". OS Landranger seems to call it West Lea these days.
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Chris Bertram
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Re: Towns changing names

Post by Chris Bertram » Mon Jun 18, 2018 16:59

And towns may change their names, but aristocratic titles don't change with them. There's a House of Lords byelection among the Crossbench peers to replace Earl Baldwin of Bewdley (a descendant of PM Stanley Baldwin), who has retired. Among the many candidates is the Earl of Carnarvon, resolutely sticking to the historic anglicised version of the town's name. Presumably it's not easy to amend the letters patent that created his title. Or perhaps he's just not bothered about it.
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KeithW
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Re: Towns changing names

Post by KeithW » Mon Jun 18, 2018 19:04

Chris Bertram wrote:
Mon Jun 18, 2018 16:54
The town that I grew up knowing as Seaham Harbour has lost its "Harbour" and is now simply "Seaham". But the harbour is still there, now doing business out of leisure sailing rather than coal transit. Inland, on the old A19, now B1285, there used to be an area called "New Seaham", but this seems to have disappeared from maps altogether. It was the area just south of Seaham Colliery, and would be between B1404 and B1287 today, not including the estate known as "Deneside". OS Landranger seems to call it West Lea these days.
The area has a convoluted history but as I understand it the original settlement at Seaham was monastic on the site of Seaham Hall to the North. After the dissolution it became the Manor of Seaham and St Mary The Virgin was the church of Seaham Parish.

Seaham Harbour was built much later in the early 19th century by the then Lord Londonderry to handle the coal from the Rainton and Penshaw Pits. The Seaton and Seaham Collieries were then sunk and the community that developed between them and Seaham Harbour became known as New Seaham with its own Parish Church. The Londonderry's didnt want any confusion between a dirty industrial town and their little corner of Paradise. Just to add more confusion to the mix the name of the railway station was Seaham Colliery to distinguish it from the harbour station, called Seaham, used by coal trains. As these communities coalesced they were referred to by the OS as Greater Seaham which in 1890 consisted of Seaham, New Seaham and Seaham Harbour. By 1939 Seaham Harbour Station had been closed, Seaham Colliery Station had been renamed as Seaham, the local authority was Seaham Urban District Council and the OS Maps showed the whole area as Seaham.

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Re: Towns changing names

Post by silverfoxcc » Sat Dec 01, 2018 20:47

Seeing the Humphrey Lyttleton quote remind me of his introduction on 'I'm Sorry iI haven't a Clue' when it was being broadcast from Nottingham

IIRC

The punchline following a long ramble on the history of Nottingham ended with

Not many Nottingham residents realise that many of the towns in the Middle ages were prefixed by the letter S, thus Nottingham was once known as Snottingham. This was changed to its present name in the 18th century.

However the residents of Scunthorpe have so far resisted this move

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Truvelo
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Re: Towns changing names

Post by Truvelo » Sat Dec 08, 2018 00:44

Has anyone mentioned Buttock's Booth yet? This is a suburb of Northampton which was renamed Boothville, no doubt for political reasons.
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