1925-26 MoT Map - Sheet 39 (Brighton)

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Steven
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1925-26 MoT Map - Sheet 39 (Brighton)

Post by Steven » Tue Oct 17, 2017 21:04

Today sees another new MoT map added to SABRE Maps, the 1925-26 edition of the Brighton sheet. This brings up the grand total of England and Wales MoT maps available on SABRE Maps to 70, plus another 34 Scottish sheets.

For those of you that aren't familiar with the OS Ministry of Transport Road Map series; these maps are some of the most important historical documents available to us that show the earliest days of road numbering within Great Britain. They were created literally to show those newfangled road numbers, and annually throughout the 1920s and into the 1930s sheets were re-issued to show the changed that had happened since the previous edition. Whilst the original 1922-23 editions are quite common, later revisions are much rarer and so more difficult to find - indeed, the legal deposit libraries don't have full sets.

So, take a look at it - there are at the time of writing three of the four sheets printed of the Brighton, Sussex and southern Surrey area now available on SABRE Maps. Why don't you see what changes you can find? It can be found on the 1925-27 MoT Map layer.
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From the SABRE Wiki: OS Ministry of Transport Road Map :


The Ministry of Transport Road Map (colloqually known as MoT Maps) series were the official maps to show classified roads, following their publication by the Ministry of Transport on 1st April, 1923. As such, they are possibly the most important resource documenting the early days of road numbering in Great Britain.

The equivalent mapping in Northern Ireland was the Road Map of Northern Ireland


[[File:MoT map key 1922-23.JPG|thumb|right|1922-23 edition

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Bryn666
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Re: 1925-26 MoT Map - Sheet 39 (Brighton)

Post by Bryn666 » Wed Oct 18, 2017 14:18

I had it in my head that Peacehaven etc were Victorian towns. Shows what I know.
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B1040
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Re: 1925-26 MoT Map - Sheet 39 (Brighton)

Post by B1040 » Thu Oct 19, 2017 18:24

The road between Winchelsea and Rye isn't part of the A259, which takes a little break.

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vlad
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Re: 1925-26 MoT Map - Sheet 39 (Brighton)

Post by vlad » Thu Oct 19, 2017 20:50

B1040 wrote:The road between Winchelsea and Rye isn't part of the A259, which takes a little break.
Originally roads were only classified if they were maintained by central government or a local authority. Private roads were always therefore unclassified, even if this meant that a specific road number had a gap in it.

The Winchelsea-Rye road follows part of the Royal Military Road, which would presumably have been owned by the 1920s equivalent of the MoD.
"If you expect nothing from somebody you are never disappointed." - Sylvia Plath

From the SABRE Wiki: Royal Military Road :


The Royal Military Road follows the path of the Royal Military Canal in East Sussex and Kent.

The canal, and its corresponding road were built in the early 19th century as part of a defence against Napoleon, and runs along what was once the coastline in Roman Britain, before the land to the south was reclaimed in the Middle Ages as Romney Marsh.

Today, the road is a combination of trunk road, B road, unclassified road and footpath.


[[File:Appledore Bridge, Royal Military Canal -

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