1944 Ten Mile Road Map of Great Britain

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Steven
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1944 Ten Mile Road Map of Great Britain

Post by Steven » Tue Nov 06, 2018 17:40

Well, we've had the North sheet on SABRE Maps for a while, licensed to us by the National Library of Scotland. There's a long story about its history on SABRE Maps, the short version of which being that the NLS had the sheet misfiled as a second copy of the 1932 Ten Mile Road Map, which within 30 seconds of me seeing it in their Map Library instantly flagged up that it was post-1935 with the really obvious A9 extending north of Inverness, which was one of the big changes. We eventually identified it as being from 1944, at a time when you would have thought that the Ordnance Survey might have better things to do than create or reprint new Ten Mile Road Maps.

So, for quite a long time we've had it online now. Finally it's been joined by its sibling South sheet from 1944, so now we have entire GB coverage of this edition.

Now, given we have the 1939 Ten Mile Road Map online also, I suspect that for some reason there are very few differences (if any) between the 1939 and 1944 editions - so it's time for a bit of detective work! Realistically, it's almost certainly there simply for completeness.
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Euan
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Re: 1944 Ten Mile Road Map of Great Britain

Post by Euan » Tue Nov 06, 2018 20:51

It looks like the insets for the large cities such as London and Manchester on the 1944 South sheet were able to be retrieved. Interestingly, there are blank patches on the 1939 South sheet in exactly the same places as the insets are in 1944. Presumably this is where the insets would be on the 1939 sheet? It's also worth noting that on the North sheet in both 1939 and 1944 there is a blank spot in the same place as the Glasgow inset in 1936.
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Re: 1944 Ten Mile Road Map of Great Britain

Post by si404 » Tue Nov 06, 2018 21:28

Euan wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 20:51
Presumably this is where the insets would be on the 1939 sheet?
Yes, but the 1939 map on SABRE Maps has the insets in the right geographical location, save for on the outer zooms, rather than as insets.
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Re: 1944 Ten Mile Road Map of Great Britain

Post by Steven » Wed Nov 07, 2018 07:45

si404 wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 21:28
Euan wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 20:51
Presumably this is where the insets would be on the 1939 sheet?
Yes, but the 1939 map on SABRE Maps has the insets in the right geographical location, save for on the outer zooms, rather than as insets.
That's right. Basically, it's a decision made by the person doing the georeferencing and tiling as to which solution they prefer. Ritchie preferred to put the urban area insets in the geographical position, thereby meaning that where they are provided those sections are at roughly four-inch scale but at the cost of losing the original section of the full map; whereas I prefer to keep the full original map available (and hence both versions visible), but this approach is at the cost of the urban area insets being in the original locations on the sheet. Note that Orkney and Shetland on all Ten Mile maps are actually provided as insets in the North Sea, but are always presented in their geographical location as, well, we can without losing anything.

The blank spots are generally where there is either an inset that is used elsewhere, or where there is a map title, or some other item not immediately relevant. For example, on the Route Planning Maps, there are "insets" showing Quarter Inch sheet coverage of GB, mileage charts etc.

Swings and roundabouts really.
Steven

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