Stop markings in France

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exiled
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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by exiled » Mon Aug 19, 2019 20:39

I seem to remember that Denmark like Luxembourg tended to have PaD on slip roads of motorways and expressways as a matter of course, as is still the case on the Boulevard Perepherique de Paris.
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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by Chris Bertram » Tue Aug 20, 2019 09:29

exiled wrote:
Mon Aug 19, 2019 20:39
I seem to remember that Denmark like Luxembourg tended to have PaD on slip roads of motorways and expressways as a matter of course, as is still the case on the Boulevard Perepherique de Paris.
The Périph is an exception to normal traffic law in so many ways. I had no problem driving on it, but SWMBO in the passenger seat was apprehensive, to say the least. You do need to be assertive when it's your time to change lane approaching your exit, but you will be allowed to do so. There's a lot of give and take going on. There was then a speed limit of 80 km/h (is it still?) but that seemed like an impossible dream. Perhaps it's possible overnight and weekends.
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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by exiled » Tue Aug 20, 2019 12:20

Chris Bertram wrote:
Tue Aug 20, 2019 09:29
exiled wrote:
Mon Aug 19, 2019 20:39
I seem to remember that Denmark like Luxembourg tended to have PaD on slip roads of motorways and expressways as a matter of course, as is still the case on the Boulevard Perepherique de Paris.
The Périph is an exception to normal traffic law in so many ways. I had no problem driving on it, but SWMBO in the passenger seat was apprehensive, to say the least. You do need to be assertive when it's your time to change lane approaching your exit, but you will be allowed to do so. There's a lot of give and take going on. There was then a speed limit of 80 km/h (is it still?) but that seemed like an impossible dream. Perhaps it's possible overnight and weekends.
70 now. It also has the protected lane one that appears to be increasingly common on French and Benelux motorways where a solid line separates it from lane 2.
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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by FosseWay » Tue Aug 20, 2019 13:16

exiled wrote:
Tue Aug 20, 2019 12:20
70 now. It also has the protected lane one that appears to be increasingly common on French and Benelux motorways where a solid line separates it from lane 2.
Not permanently I take it?

Dual carriageway roads in Sweden have solid lines in various contexts that aren't used in the UK (the nearest is the non-compliant use of them in tunnels, which has been bemoaned by the highways professionals on here before). The most obvious is on the mainline at onslips on motorways and similar, where there is a solid line between lanes 1 and 2 to discourage people from changing lanes at a point where the angle of attack of joining traffic is such that they cannot yet see what is coming up behind them on the mainline. The UK tends to get round this issue through better engineering, whereby the slip road is long enough for traffic on it to establish what is in L1 and how fast it's going before it runs out of road, and where lane drops/gains are less frequent. There is a heck of a lot of weaving on Swedish urban DCs/S2+1s compared to the UK, which explains to an extent the speed limits, which are also low by UK standards.

You also get solid lines between lanes going in the same direction at the immediate run-up to traffic lights. I presume this is to discourage people in L1 realising at the last minute that L2 is empty and that they may be able to get to their destination 0.00001 second faster if they suddenly pull out round the vehicle in front when they get green, without noticing the vehicle barrelling up behind them in L2. Or suddenly realising they are in the wrong lane for their destination with the same result.

Solid lines in general are taken more seriously here. Although they mean the same in both jurisdictions (do not cross them), in the UK they are interpreted by the man in the street as "do not overtake", which is subtly different. I'm not aware of anecdotal evidence of people being fined for clipping a solid line with 1 or 2 wheels on a bend in the UK, whereas this does happen, even in the snow where the line is not obvious, in Sweden.

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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by exiled » Tue Aug 20, 2019 15:25

I think the 70 km/h limit is now permanent. Though if you can get to 70 on the BP it is probably 0100 hours!
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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by FosseWay » Tue Aug 20, 2019 15:33

I meant about the solid line. It must be a broken one away from junctions, I take it?

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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by exiled » Tue Aug 20, 2019 16:29

I'll try and GSV later. I think they are permanent.
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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by Nwallace » Fri Aug 23, 2019 17:07

exiled wrote:France definitely likes roundabouts, I've noticed that where various town halls retain PaD it is increasingly signed as such.
Yes, during pbp I noted the various different ways the maire was telling you about Pad in their town.

I crossed a few circles on the way into brest that were definitley not signed, painted or prioritised as roundabouts!



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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by Nwallace » Fri Aug 23, 2019 17:11

One of the most amusing sights I saw was a town where the main road remained priority route.

Every driveway had a giveaway line and sign at the end of it!



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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by exiled » Fri Aug 23, 2019 18:34

Does not surprise me, I remember somewhere in either the NL or Belgium that had a priority diamond and 70 km/h limit after the same.
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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by Bryn666 » Tue Aug 27, 2019 12:27

FosseWay wrote:
Tue Aug 20, 2019 15:33
I meant about the solid line. It must be a broken one away from junctions, I take it?
The BP is 70km/h throughout (mainly due to pollution reasons, although as you know even 50km/h is ambitious during the day on many sections of it) - the solid lines are indeed permissive on the lane closest to the exit so you can move left but not right.

The trick is;

* NEVER change lanes unless you have to, this annoys the locals - especially the mopeds that blast between cars at full pelt.
* Know your junction and how far off it you are. The next Porte is always signed at an exit diverge so you've got advance warning, sometimes as much as a luxurious 900m! :laugh: :laugh:

I love the BP. It's utterly mad.
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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by Nwallace » Wed Aug 28, 2019 21:29

My photos from PBP are now in my onedrive

I've not bothered weeding out the sabristic from the cycling though

https://1drv.ms/u/s!AlB7bV6RdTovhutpzuF ... w?e=afahRV

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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by Norfolktolancashire » Tue Sep 10, 2019 22:08

Nwallace wrote:
Wed Aug 28, 2019 21:29
My photos from PBP are now in my onedrive

I've not bothered weeding out the sabristic from the cycling though

https://1drv.ms/u/s!AlB7bV6RdTovhutpzuF ... w?e=afahRV

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Good to see the N165 bridge from the cycle bridge, although the old bridge looked that knackered I'm surprised it took even the weight of one cyclist!

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@48.38816 ... 384!8i8192

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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by Nwallace » Fri Sep 13, 2019 16:15

Think it's the classic French deception, it may look knackered but it's structurally sound.

I noticed this with their roads too, I saw signs that I worked out meant "sorry about the poor state of the road" those roads were much better to ride on that any I've ridden in northern England or Scotland the last 10 years.

As opposed to the British where it may look good but it's just wallpaper.

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Re: Stop markings in France

Post by Nwallace » Fri Sep 13, 2019 21:08

This is an example of what I mean "Deformed Carriageway", really?!
https://1drv.ms/u/s!AlB7bV6RdTovhukYzuFTDgp8JcUE4w

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