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Network changes - 1920s

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A list of the changes to the road network in Great Britain from 1920 - 1929. Includes road openings and renumberings.

Road Openings

Year Number on opening Location County Notes
1920 - Derby Outer Ring Road Derbyshire Kenilworth Avenue between Stenson Road and Derby Lane. It became part of B5381 then A5111.
1921 - Aberdeen Middle Ring Road Aberdeenshire Stage 2 - St. Machar Drive, from Great Northern Road, Kittybrewster to King Street, Old Aberdeen, was opened between October and December 1921. It would also form part of the Inner Ring Road. Cost £23,850. The link from Anderson Drive on the line of Milton Road and Printfield Walk was never built. Initially unclassified, it later became part of A978.
1921 - Bristol Kellaway Avenue Gloucestershire The road from Horfield was opened on 23 November 1921 by F.G. Kellaway, Postmaster-General. He had spent his early years in the area. It gave the northern part of the city direct access to the Downs. Initially it may only have gone to Golden Hill, then extended to Westbury Park. Cost £40,000. It became B4468.
1921 - Lincoln Outer Circle Lincolnshire The section from Wragby Road to Greetwell Road. It became B1108. Later renumbered B1308. It was the first part of a scheme for a further ring road around the city. However, only one further section was built - the unclassified Outer Circle Drive between Nettleham Road and Wragby Road in the late 1930s.
1922 - Gowerton to Penclawdd Glamorgan The 1.75 mile road had been opened by the 1922-23 MOT map. Tenders were requested in May 1920, so the road may possibly have opened in 1921. It was the first of 4 sections of the Gowerton to Llanrhidian new road which was fully completed on 26 April 1928. Numbered as B4295.
1922 - Great West Road Middlesex The first section to open was a mile between Syon Lane and Thornbury Road, Osterley on 21 August 1922. The road opened in stages before completion in 1925. It bacame part of A4.
1922 - Ton-y-Pistyll to Newbridge Monmouthshire The 0.5 mile New Bryngwyn Road and Park Road to Newbridge was opened in July 1922. It was built on the line of an old tramway. Cost £9,274. Later renumbered as B4472 but since de-classified.
1922 - Nottingham Outer Ring Road Nottinghamshire 1st section. Valley Road opened from the current A60 Mansfield Road at Daybrook to the current B682 Nottingham Road at Basford. An unemployment relief scheme, forecast cost £103,700. 50% loan funded by the Government's Arterial Road funding scheme. Later became part of A614 and currently A6514
1923 A165 Bridlington Kingsgate Yorkshire The 2.5 mile road from Bridlington to Carnaby Moor, bypassing Carnaby, was opened on 31 July 1923 by Lord Deramore, Chairman of East Riding County Council. Cost was £37,000 of which £13,000 and a substantial amount of land was given by Col, A.G.W. Wright, D,L, of Bessingby Hall. It was 60 feet wide with a 24 foot carriageway. there were 8 foot footpaths within the Borough. Later renumbered A1038, apart from the southernmost 0.5 mile.
1923 A20 Eltham Bypass Kent The 3.25 mile road was opened on 17 May 1923 by Col. Wilfred Ashley, Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Transport. The first modern bypass according to an old Shell book about Roads. It had a 50 foot carriageway, two 15 foot footways and a maximum gradient of 1 in 40. The work which was under direction of J Sutcliffe, engineer and surveyor to Woolwich Borough Council, had taken 2.5 years with an average of 122 men employed.
1923 A20 Foots Cray (Sidcup) to Wrotham Kent The 14 mile road was opened on 4 August 1923 by Mrs Wilfrid Ashley, wife of the Minister of Transport. It included the Farningham and Wrotham bypasses. The width was 80 feet with a 30 foot carriageway. Work had taken 18 months and employed an average of 500 men. Contractors were Holloway Brothers (London) Ltd. and Roads and Public Works Ltd., Westminster at a cost of £445,000.
1923 A226 Gravesend to Strood Kent The 5.25 mile road improvement was opened on 4 August 1923 by Mrs Wilfrid Ashley, wife of the Minister of Transport. The carriageway was 40 foot wide with 20 foot verges. The contractor was Messrs. Henry Boot and Sons (London) Ltd. at a cost of £240,000. It included the Chalk bypass.
1923 A373 Braunton Northern Approach Devon Chaloners Road, bypassing East Street and Church Street and connecting to Ilfracombe Road, was opened on 15 October 1923 by Lord Portsmouth. Cost £3,700. Later became A361.
1923 A548 Rhyl to Gronant Flintshire The 6.5 mile road which passed through Prestatyn was opened on 21 September 1923 by Sir Henry Maybury, Director-General of Roads at Ministry of Transport. The reinforced concrete road cost £35,000.
1923 - Barkston Bypass Lincolnshire Opened between 4 August 1923 and 10 November 1923. Later renumbered as A607.
1923 - Derby Outer Ring Road Derbyshire Warwick Avenue between Burton Road (former A38, later A5250) and Stenson Road. It became part of B5381 then A5111.
1923 - Newbridge to Crumlin Monmouthshire The 0.6 mile Park Road was opened on 10 July 1923. Cost £17,000. It was built on the line of an old tramway. Later renumbered as B4472 but since de-classified.
1924 A13 Rainham - Purfleet Bypass Essex Opened in August 1924.
1924 A2 First Dartford Bypass Kent Opened by Edward Prince of Wales (later King Edward VIII) on 19 November 1924.
1924 A2 Dartford to Strood (Watling Street upgrade) Kent The 11.75 mile Arterial road was opened by Edward Prince of Wales (later King Edward VIII) on 19 November 1924, the same day as the Dartford Bypass. The two schemes cost £1.12million. Work started in late 1921 and was an unemployment relief scheme for London County. The 100 foot wide road had a 40 foot carriageway with 22 foot footpaths and 8 foot verges on either side. Maximum gradient was 1 in 25. It replaced the route of the present A226 as part of the London - Rochester trunk route. Earlier maps have Watling Street as either a minor road or completely missing (e.g. around Swanscombe Park).
1924 A22 Croydon Surrey "Purley Way" (now A23). The 4 mile road opened in July 1924. There were few users initially due to lack of signpost directions for the bypass.
1924 A370 Worle bypass Somerset The mile long road opened in December 1924.
1924 A565 Southport Southern Approach Lancashire Waterloo Road extension, Southport was opened on 2 August 1924 by Harry Gosling, Minister of Transport. A bypass for Birkdale. A 75 foot road with a 27 foot carriageway.
1924 A876 Great Western Road, Glasgow Dunbartonshire The 3.5 mile County section from Duntocher to Bowling was opened in December 1924 by Lieut-Colonel Wilfred Ashley, Minister of Transport. It was 70 feet wide with a 40 foot carriageway and 10 foot footpath. Contractor was Messrs. Sharks & M'Ewan, tender price £92,336. It may not have been numbered until the Glasgow section was fully opened in 1930. A portion of A810 was used at the Duntocher end. Renumbered as A82 in 1935.
1924 B4282 Cwmavon to Maesteg Glamorgan The 4.25 mile road was opened on 3 May 1924 by Sir Harry Gosling, Minister of Transport. It was a combination of upgrade and re-alignments of the existing minor road and new build sections and was described as the new Port Talbot to Maesteg road.
1924 B4296 Gowerton to Dunvant Glamorgan The 1.8 mile road was opened on 17 May 1924 by Sir John Cecil Davies of Messrs. Baldwins (Limited), the engineers. Contractor was South Wales Construction Company, Swansea and it had taken 2.5 years to complete. It was 30 feet wide and cost £19,000.
1924 - Great West Road Middlesex The section open by February 1924 had been extended westwards to the Bath Road (start was still at Syon Lane) creating a bypass for Hounslow. The road opened in stages before completion in 1925. It became part of A4.
1924 - Aberdulais to Crynant Glamorgan The 3.5 mile road was opened on 1 January 1924 by Sir Henry Maybury, Director-General of Roads at Ministry of Transport. This was a new road for the southern 2 miles and widening with re-alignments at the Crynant end. It provided work for the unemployed, improved access to a rich new anthracite coalfield and was 30 feet wide. Cost £70,288 with 50% funded by the Ministry. It was not classified in 1922 but was renumbered A4109 by 1932.
1924 - Derby Outer Ring Road Derbyshire Manor Road between Uttoxeter New Road (A516) and Burton Road (former A38, later A5250). It became part of B5381 then A5111.
1924 Nottingham Nottinghamshire "University Boulevard", funded by Sir Jesse Boot to provide a new route from Beeston to Nottingham. It is not shown as A453 until 1936. later renumbered to A6005
1925 A106 Eastern Avenue Essex The 8 mile road from Wanstead to Gallows Corner, north east of Romford was officially opened on 25 March 1925 by Prince Henry (later the Duke of Gloucester). Sections had opened earlier. Work had begun in 1921. Later renumbered A12.
1925 A108 Great Cambridge Road (Tottenham - Wormley) Middlesex • Hertfordshire Sections had been opened earlier. All but a mile, by Cheshunt, had been completed by June 1924. The 11.5 mile road was laid with concrete which became cracked and worn within a year. Later renumbered as A10.
1925 A127 Southend Arterial Road Essex The 21 mile road from Gallows Corner to Southend was opened on 25 March 1925 by Prince Henry (later the Duke of Gloucester). Sections had opened earlier. Work had begun in 1921. With Eastern Avenue it was then the longest new road in the country.
1925 A1081 Woodford Spur Essex Woodford Avenue connecting George Lane, Woodford to A106 Eastern Avenue was opened on 25 March 1925 by Lieut. Col. Moore-Brabazon, Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Transport. Later renumbered A406 then A1400.
1925 A1102 Lincoln Inner Circle Lincolnshire Ruskin Avenue was named in March 1925. Possibly works had completed in 1924. It connected Nettleham Road and Wragby Road and was the final part of the Inner Circle Road between A57 and A46. It may have been B1193 for a short while before the Inner Circle was renumbered A1102. Later renumbered B1182.
1925 A38 Norton bypass Gloucestershire The 545 yard road opened on 29 April 1925. Cost was £10,000. There was a 24 foot carriageway and the "Topeka" asphalt surface had a 7 years guarantee.
1925 A38 Thurloxton Deviation Somerset The 0.5 mile road opened in October /November 1925 to bypass the southern part of the village near to Adsborough.
1925 A370 Congresbury Somerset New half mile deviation north of new Congresbury bridge and widening and improvement on Rhodyate Hill.
1925 A4 Great West Road (Chiswick - Cranford) Middlesex The final section bypassing Brentford was completed and the full 8 mile road, which included the A30 section to Bedfont, was officially opened by King George V on 30 May 1925. It was a 120 foot road with a 50 foot carriageway. One unusual feature of the road was miniature lighthouses at danger spots.
1925 A43 Geddington Bypass Northamptonshire New Road was opened on 14 November 1925 by Sir Henry Maybury, Director-General of Roads to the Ministry of Transport. It was 50 foot wide with a 24 foot carriageway and footpath on the west side. The 675 yard road took 15 months to complete and employed 30 men. Contractor was Sir William Prescott and Sons Ltd. Later renumbered A4300.
1925 A565 Southport Northern Approach Lancashire Preston New Road, Southport was opened on 29 July 1925. A bypass for Cressens. A 75 foot road with a 27 foot carriageway.
1925 - Horfield to Eastville Gloucestershire The 1.9 mile Muller Road in Bristol opened in March 1925. It employed an average of 132 men for 140 weeks and cost £93,909, 65% funded by the Ministry. Later numbered B4469.
1926 A1 Colsterworth Bypass Lincolnshire The 2 mile long bypass opened for general use on 4 February 1926, cost £33,500. The width between fences was 60 feet with a 20 foot single carriageway. It was dualled later. About 0.3 miles of the northernmost alignment survives due to a later deviation.
1926 A165 Brandesburton Bypass Yorkshire The 0.5 mile New Road. Tree planting took place in July 1926, although it may have been opened earlier, in 1925. Later de-classified.
1926 A165 Fraisthorpe Bypass Yorkshire A 0.75 mile road. Tree planting took place in July 1926, although it may have been opened earlier, in 1925.
1926 A165 Lissett Bypass Yorkshire The 0.3 mile New Cut. Tree planting took place in July 1926, although it may have been opened earlier, in 1925. Contractor was H. Coxhead & Co. Ltd., Middlesborough.
1926 A1089 Chadwell St Mary Bypass Essex
1926 A20 Sidcup & Foots Cray Bypass Kent The 2 mile road opened on 31 March 1926. Contractor was Sir William Arrol and Co, Westminster at a cost of £100,000.
1926 A20 Hariettsham Bypass Kent The 0.75 mile road opened on 28 October 1926.
1926 A20 Charing Southern Bypass Kent The 800 yard road on the Folkestone road opened on 19 May 1926.
1926 A252 Charing Northern Bypass Kent The 800 yard road towards Canterbury opened on 1 April 1926. The road was 60 feet wide with a 30 foot carriageway and footpath. The carriageway was of reinforced concrete of 8 inch thickness.
1926 A36 Bristol Portway Gloucestershire The 5.2 mile road from Hotwells to Avonmouth was opened on 2 July 1926 by Colonel Wilfred Ashley, Minister of Transport. It cost £800,000, making it one of the most expensive road schemes in the country. The Government contribution was £200,000. It had taken 5 years to build, had average daily employment of 800 and a minimum width of 65 feet. Renumbered A4 in 1935.
1926 A38 Clay Mills Derbyshire Monks Bridge bypass was opened on 23 September 1926 by Sir Henry Maybury, Director-General of Roads. The new bridge was a viaduct over the River Dove and marshes and formed a 900 yard long single carriageway bypass to the medieval Monks Bridge. Cost £42,000.
1926 A5 Gobowen Bypass Shropshire The 0.5 mile road bypassed Gobowen Crossroads.
1926 A6 Garstang Lancashire Garstang Bypass, later bypassed by M6 in 1960s.
1926 A63 Melton Bypass Yorkshire The 0.75 mile road was open by 9 November 1926. Work had started after January 1926. The initial A63 route west of Melton used Lowfield Lane and Poolbank Road so missed Welton.
1926 A612 Thurgarton Nottinghamshire A 0.5 mile road to avoid 3 dangerous bends south of the village.
1926 - Hessle Bypass Yorkshire Stage 1 - The 0.75 mile section from Anlaby Road to Pickering Road was opened on 16 March 1926. Described as the first of the Hull to Liverpool road improvements. Cost £30,400. Later numbered A1105 then A63 and back to A1105.
1926 - Littledean to Pope's Hill Gloucestershire The 1.25 mile unclassified road now known as The Slad was opened in July 1926. The road had originally been authorised by an 1883 Act of Parliament. When the Crown finally agreed to finance the road they only agreed to fund the part on the Forest Crown land which stopped half a mile short of the Flaxley road. The local Rural District Councils were left to finance that half mile.
1927 A1 Welwyn Hertfordshire Welwyn Bypass, later renumbered to B197 in 1960s.
1927 A163 Bainton Yorkshire The 0.3 mile cut through the village opened in June 1927. The villagers had petitioned for a bypass away from the village, to no avail. Later renumbered A614
1927 A163 Kirkburn Bypass Yorkshire The 0.7 mile bypass of the twisty village road opened on 19 June 1927. Later renumbered A614
1927 A166 Nafferton Bypass Yorkshire The 0.35 mile New Road opened in June 1927. Later de-classified.
1927 A1058 Newcastle to Tynemouth Coast Road Northumberland The 4.7 mile road between Chillingham Road, Newcastle Upon Tyne to Queen Alexander Road West, Tynemouth was opened by Col. Wilfrid Ashley, Minister of Transport, on 27 October 1927. The width was 100 feet with a 30 foot reinforced concrete carriageway and 7 foot footpaths and allowing for future dualling. Contractor for the road was Charles Warren, Wallasley, cost £180,000.
1927 A20 Lenham Bypass Kent The 1.25 mile road was opened by Lady Cornwallis on 12 April 1927. It was the completing link on the reconstruction of 12 miles of the A20 between Maidstone and Charing that had started in January 1925 and which had cost £320,000, 75% funded by the Ministry.
1927 A21 Farnborough Bypass Surrey The 1.7 mile road was opened by Mrs Wilfrid Ashley, wife of the Minister of Transport, on 13 April 1927. It was 80 feet wide with a 30 foot carriageway and bituminous surface. Scheme cost was to be £143,000. There was a further 1.2 miles of widening on the Hastings road.
1927 A217 Sutton Surrey Sutton Bypass.
1927 A3 Kingston Bypass Surrey Opened on 15 April 1927.
1927 A38 Buckfastleigh Devon The original bypass opened on 10 October 1927.
1927 A39 Parracombe Bypass Devon The 2 mile deviation at an altitude of 800 feet was opened on 21 October 1927 by Mrs Higgs of Holsworthy. Steepest gradient was 1 in 20 compared to 1 in 5 on the road through the village. During the 3 year construction it rained on 2 days out of 3. Cost £27,000.
1927 A358 Ashill Improvement Somerset
1927 A377 Bishops Tawton Bypass Somerset The short deviation and straightening opened in November 1927.
1927 A390 St. Austell Bypass Cornwall The 1.75 mile road was opened on 4 November 1927 by Sir Henry Maybury, Director-General of the Ministry of Transport. It was 50 feet wide with a 20 foot carriageway. Cost £50,000. After the long procession had gone along the bypass they were then held up in the narrow town Main Street by a pony milk cart and a china clay waggon pulled by a team of 5 horses - proof that the bypass was needed.
1927 A40 Dashwood Hill Bypass Buckinghamshire The 3/4 mile road between West Wycombe and Stokenchurch was opened on 27 October 1927. It bypassed a 1 in 10 hill in the Chilterns that had caused problems to laden lorries. The new road had a gradient of 1 in 22, was 30 foot wide with 20 foot carriageway and 5 foot footpath. Contractor was Messrs. Aubrey Watson Ltd., Westminster, cost £50,000.
1927 A4059 Abercynon to Mountain Ash Glamorgan The 3.3 mile road was opened on 4 September 1927 by Lord Aberdare. It was constructed along the line of the old Aberdare Canal and was part of an onward scheme to Aberdare. It was 50 feet wide with a 30 foot carriageway.
1927 A4123 Wolverhampton - Birmingham New Road Staffordshire • Worcestershire The 9.5 mile section from A4039 to A456 was opened on 2 November 1927 by the Prince of Wales (the future Edward VIII). The first purpose-built inter-city highway of the modern era. Opened as S4. Contract cost £573,750. Further history at A4123 wiki page.
1927 A5092 Barnet Bypass (Stirling Corner to Stanborough) Hertfordshire Opened by Alderman H. Brown, chairman of Hertfordshire County Council's Highways Committee) on 19 October 1927.
1927 A6 Heversham and Leasgill Bypass Westmorland The 1.2 mile Princes Way was opened on 29 June 1927 by the Prince of Wales (future King Edward VIII). It was 60 feet wide with a 30 foot carriageway and footpath. The scheme cost was £38,117.
1927 A6097 Gunthorpe Bridge, Gunthorpe and East Bridgford Bypasses Nottinghamshire The bridge and 1.75 miles of new approach roads were opened on 17 November 1927 by Prince of Wales, the future Edward VIII. Cost £125,000.
1927 A876 Great Western Road, Glasgow Dunbartonshire Anniesland Cross to Duntocher had opened by May 1927 apart from 1200 yards around the Forth and Clyde Canal crossing - a vital missing link. It may not have been numbered until the Glasgow section was fully opened once the Cloberhill Bridge had been completed in September 1930. Renumbered as A82 in 1935.
1927 A902 Barnton Junction to Maybury Junction Midlothian The 1.5 mile Maybury Road was opened on 21 April 1927 by Sir Henry Maybury, Director-General of Roads. It enabled Leith traffic from the west to bypass Edinburgh city centre. Cost £48,266, exclusive of the southern junction. A section of the Edinburgh - Glasgow New Road.
1927 B1248 Lund Bypass Yorkshire The 0.35 mile road from the Middleton road to North Road had opened by 3 September 1927. Work started after January 1927. It created a full bypass using existing roads to the south.
1927 - Aberdeen Middle Ring Road Aberdeenshire Stage 3 - Anderson Drive between Cairnery Road and Great Northern Road, Middlefield was opened in 1927. Forecast cost was £41,000. Initially unclassified, it became part of A947 in 1930 when the full ring road opened, and later became part of A92.
1927 - Gloucester Eastern Bypass Gloucestershire 1st section. Finlay Road, between Stroud Road and Tredworth Road was opened on 12 April 1927 by Mrs D.E. Finlay, Mayoress of Gloucester. The road was 70 foot wide with a 40 foot carriageway. Cost was £19,318. Later renumbered A38.
1927 - Nottingham Outer Ring Road Nottinghamshire 2nd section. Middleton Boulevard opened from the current A609 Wollaton Road to the current A52 Derby Road at Basford. Later became part of A614 and currently A6514
1928 A1 East Linton Bypass East Lothian The 2/3 mile bypass opened following the new bridge over the East Coast Main Line being put into place on 2 December 1928. The new iron bridge weighed 160 tons and was run into position on a trolley mounted on rails (some trolley!). It allowed a 50 foot roadway below it. A separate bridge over the River Tyne had been constructed in 1927. The bypass was later renumbered as A199.
1928 A1 Tyne Bridge Durham • Northumberland Now part of A167.
1928 A1 Foston Bypass Lincolnshire Opened on 29 February 1928. Single carriageway.
1928 A118 East Ham and Barking Bypass Essex The 3.5 mile road between Canning Town and Ripple Road opened on 26 May 1928. It was built as a link from London to the new town of Dagenham with forecast population 120,000. Scheme cost £350,000. A portion of the road was initially laid, as an experiment, with 20 different materials to study the behaviour of each under traffic. Now part of A13.
1928 A1106 Spalding Northern Bypass Lincolnshire The 0.6 mile West Elloe Avenue was fully opened on 23 January 1928 upon the opening of the new bridge over the River Welland. The road section had been completed on 23 November 1926 but it then only aided access from Pinchbeck Road to the sugar beet factory. Road cost was £12,352 and bridge cost £30,000.
1928 A2 Bexleyheath Bypass Kent The 5.7 mile road opened on 2 July 1928. Work had commenced in 1924 and contract cost was £381,000.
1928 A4 Colnbrook Bypass Berkshire Opened on 18 June 1928. The carriageway was 30 foot wide. Contractor was Messrs. J. Cronk and Sons, Brixton Hill and work began in October 1925. Cost £250,000.
1928 A4 Twyford Bypass Berkshire It was opened on 10 September 1928 by J.H. Benyon, Lord-Leiutenant of Berkshire.
1928 A45 Daventry Bypass Northamptonshire The first bypass. Part may have been open in 1927.
1928 A406 North Circular Road Essex Bridge carrying Wadham Road over railway line opened, replacing level crossing.
1928 A468 Nantgarw to Caerphilly Diversion Glamorgan A 0.8 mile new road at the Nantgarw end was opened on 21 December 1928 by Alderman Joseph Howell. Cost £20,000. It bypassed a steep climb and bends.
1928 A4093 Llangeinor to Pant-yr-awel Glamorgan The 1.75 mile new road was opened on 22 November 1928 by Alderman William Saunders, Glamorgan County Council Chairman. It had taken 12 months to complete and cost £20,000. The winding road over the saddle connected the Garw and Ogmore valleys.
1928 A4107 / A4061 Bwlch-y-Clawdd Roads Glamorgan The three roads from the Bwlch-y-Clawdd hub (1704 feet altitude) to the valleys were opened on 3 February 1928 by Wilfred Ashley, Minister of Transport. They connected Nant-y-moel (Ogmore Valley), Cwmparc (Rhondda Valley) and Abergwynfi (Afan Valley). The 10 mile scheme cost £160,000. Carriageway width was 20 feet with a 5 foot space for pedestrians. Steepest gradient was 1 in 15.
1928 A4127 Greenford Road Middlesex New build, replacing north end of B358.
1928 A6 Bolton-le-Sands Bypass Lancashire The 1,334 yard road opened on 6 September 1928. It was 50 foot wide with a 30 foot carriageway. A new re-inforced concrete bridge with 30 foot span was built over the Lancaster Canal. Contractor was John Dickinson & Co (Bolton) Ltd. Cost was £48,918 with 50% funded by Ministry of Transport. Named Bye-Pass Road.
1928 A6119 Blackburn Northern Bypass Lancashire
1928 B4295 Penclawdd to Llanrhidian Glamorgan The final 4th section of the Gowerton to Llanrhidian new road was opened on 26 April 1928 by Mr. J.C. Newcombe, Chairman of Gower Rural district Council. The first 3 sections had been constructed by direct labour costing £26,000 and the final section by Messrs, Tomas and Lewis, Penclawdd for £10,273. Construction had started in 1920 with the earlier sections being opened in the years following.
1928 B4436 Bishopston diversion Glamorgan The 0.4 mile road over The Sker was opened on 13 September 1928.
1928 - Aberdeen Middle Ring Road Aberdeenshire Stage 4 - Anderson Drive between Bridge of Dee and Great Western Road was opened between May and August 1928. Forecast cost was £34,360. Initially unclassified, it became part of A947 in 1930 when the full ring road opened, and later became part of A92.
1928 - Nottingham Nottinghamshire "Abbey Bridge", between Dunkirk and Lenton, completed the new route from Beeston to Nottingham. It is not shown as A453 until 1936. later renumbered to A6005
1929 A1 Wansford Northamptonshire Wansford Bypass as single carriageway
1929 A1041 Boothferry Bridge Howden Bypass Yorkshire Both opened on 18 July 1929. The bridge was 695 feet long with a 223 feet swing span. Cost was £116,467. The 2 mile Howden bypass cost £41,640. Later renumbered as A614.
1929 A38 White Ball Diversion Somerset The 1 mile road SW of Beam Bridge, Sampford Arundel was opened in June 1929. Confusion as to right of way at the junction with the old road at Beam Bridge caused an accident on 18 June 1929. The new road had opened about a week earlier. The A38 went underneath the railway there prior to a later improvement.
1929 A453 Chilwell Bypass Nottinghamshire Quaintly named "Bye Pass Road".
1929 A4058 Treherbert to Rhigos Glamorgan The 7.5 mile Rhigos Road was opened on 4 November 1929. The carriageway was 20 feet wide and a footpath was provided. The highest point was at 1640 feet at Mynydd Beili-glas. Contractor for the southern 2 miles was David Rees, Treherbert and the northern 5.5 miles Messrs. Graham, Sons & Co. Later renumbered to A4061 in 1935. The section north to Penderyn was never built.
1929 A4109 Glynneath to Banwen Glamorgan The 4.5 mile road was also opened on 4 November 1929. Contractor was John McColville, Abergavenny.
1929 A982 Crewe Toll to Blackhall Midlothian The 1.25 mile Telford Road was opened on 4 January 1929. It provided a bypass for Drylaw and Davidson's Mains via the A90 road. A section of the Edinburgh - Glasgow New Road. Later renumbered as A902.

Other changes in 1920s

The following changes from the original 1922/23 classification appear on the 1928/29 edition of MoT Road Map sheet 38 covering the Southampton, Portsmouth and Salisbury areas:

  • A3024 extended from Northam Bridge to Botley
  • A3049 number allocated to Western Road, Cosham (between A3 & A27)
  • A3067 number allocated to Burgess Road, Southampton between A33 and A335
  • B2177 number allocated to Bedhampton to Purbrook road
  • B3036 renumbered A3051
  • B3042 through Stockbridge and Romsey to Southampton renumbered A3057
  • B3054 west of Lymington renumbered A3068
  • B3056 renumbered A3069 (B3056 retained for Shrubbs Hill Road, Lyndhurst)
  • B3057 number re-used for Burgess Road, Southampton between A35 and A33/A3067
  • B3085 through Winterbourne Gunner to Salisbury renumbered A3052
  • B3090 through Wylye renumbered A3036
  • B3333 number allocated to South St, Bury Rd and Ann's Hill Rd, Gosport
  • B3334 number allocated to Brockhurst to Titchfield road
  • B3347 number allocated to Winkton to Christchurch road
  • B3351 number allocated to Corfe Castle to Studland road
  • B3368 number allocated to Branksome to Poole Head (B3369 junction)
  • B3369 number allocated to Poole to Sandbanks road
  • B3379 number allocated to road running north-eastwards from Stockbridge (later to become the A30)
  • B3380 number allocated to Wimpson Lane, Southampton between A35 and A3057

Isle of Wight:

  • B3322 between Parkhurst and Totland renumbered A3054
  • B3325 renumbered A3055
  • B3325 number re-used for Northwood to Cowes road via Gurnard
  • B3326 renumbered A3056
  • B3326 number re-used for Monkton Street, Ryde
  • B3327 re-routed to run Godshill to Ventnor via Whitwell
  • B3340 number allocated to Steyne Road, Seaview
  • B3341 number allocated to Castle Road and Hill, Carisbrooke

The following changes from the original 1922/23 classification appear on the 1925/26 edition of MoT Road Map sheet 40 covering the Kent and East Sussex areas:

  • A289 allocated to road between A2 and A228 near Strood
  • B2042 upgraded to A290
  • B2044 upgraded to A291
  • B2068 extended from New Inn Green to Canterbury via Stone Street
  • B2072 upgraded to A292
  • B2158 allocated to link road in Chatham
  • B2159 allocated to Love Lane, Faversham
  • B2160 allocated to Kipping's Cross - Paddock Wood road
  • B2161 allocated to Paddock Wood - Five Oak Green road
  • B2162 allocated to Lamberhurst - Yalding road
  • B2163 allocated to Langley - Hollingbourne - Sittingbourne Road
  • B2164 allocated to Kennington - Willesborough road near Ashford




Network changes - 1920s
Historical Information
1922 Road Lists Class IZone 1 • Zone 2 • Zone 3 • Zone 4 • Zone 5 • Zone 6 • Zone 7 • Zone 8 • Zone 9 • Northern Ireland
1922 Road Lists Class IIZone 1 • Zone 2 • Zone 3 • Zone 4 • Zone 5 • Zone 6 • Zone 7 • Zone 8 • Zone 9 • Northern Ireland
1935 Road numbering revisionZone 1 • Zone 2 • Zone 3 • Zone 4 • Zone 5 • Zone 6 • Zone 7 • Zone 8 • Zone 9
Mass renumbering schemes1922 Draft Road Lists • 1924 A1 Renumbering • 1920s South Buckinghamshire Renumbering • 1933 A30 Renumbering • 1933 Scotland Renumbering Proposals • 1934 A82 Renumbering • Tyneside Renumberings • Motorway linked Renumberings • Republic of Ireland T and L roads
Network Changes1700-1799 • 1800-1899 • 1900-1909 • 1910-1919 • 1920-1929 • 1930-1939 • 1940-1949 • 1950-1959 • 1960-1969 • 1970-1979 • 1980-1989 • 1990-1999 • 2000-2009 • 2010-2019 • 2020-2029


SABRE - The Society for All British and Irish Road Enthusiasts
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