Lost Arterial A24 was D2 grassed bridge near Kingston Bypss

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A303Paul
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Lost Arterial A24 was D2 grassed bridge near Kingston Bypss

Post by A303Paul »

does anyone know the story behind

This?
Last edited by A303Paul on Wed Dec 12, 2007 21:14, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by superbfc »

No, but follow Knollmeade east and it looks suspiciously like it is / was supposed to meet Sheephouse Way which is also a S2 with verge wide enough to accommodate another carriageway.

Look at Gilders Road to the SW and zoom out and what jumps to mind?
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M45 Tailback
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Post by M45 Tailback »

Was this a possible 1920's or 30's alternative for the A3 instead of the Kingston Bypass?
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Post by Paul »

superbfc wrote:No, but follow Knollmeade east and it looks suspiciously like it is / was supposed to meet Sheephouse Way which is also a S2 with verge wide enough to accommodate another carriageway.

Look at Gilders Road to the SW and zoom out and what jumps to mind?
And Jubilee Way on the same alignment. If ever there was a typical name for a relief road, it's that.
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Post by superbfc »

Paul wrote:
superbfc wrote:No, but follow Knollmeade east and it looks suspiciously like it is / was supposed to meet Sheephouse Way which is also a S2 with verge wide enough to accommodate another carriageway.

Look at Gilders Road to the SW and zoom out and what jumps to mind?
And Jubilee Way on the same alignment. If ever there was a typical name for a relief road, it's that.
Yes... That went without saying as Gilders / Jubilee / Knollmead / Sheephouse makes for quite a nice run.
M45 Tailback wrote:Was this a possible 1920's or 30's alternative for the A3 instead of the Kingston Bypass?
Exactly what I'm thinking. 1930s I think. The only thing that knocks that theory is that the Kingston By-Pass appears to be the same age as Warren Way / Knollmead

Can anyone date the Kingston By-Pass?
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Post by Truvelo »

Wow. It's amazing what turns up. Maybe it was built to compliment the Kingston Bypass rather than instead of it, perhaps as a local distributor whereby local traffic would use it to avoid clogging up the A3. Whatever it is, it's an exciting find.

Kingston Bypass is 1927 according to a post in the atlas dating project.
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Post by t1(M) »

Note also that Cox Lane, which makes a 90 degree junction with Jubilee Way, continues further east. It seems Jubilee Way replaced part of Cox Lane.

The name of the trading estate suggests that the eponymous Jubilee was the one in 1935.
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Post by A303Paul »

This is fascinating.

If you look at the northeast end of Sheephouse Way and scan out

follow the railway line east, and on the east of the second railway line just below the junction of the two railway lines there is a green bridge ramp

From there I know that it was planned before WW2 to make Green Lane a proper road which would continue to the roundabout at the end of Lower Morden Lane

Now carry along Lower Morden Lane to the A24 and you note that it hits the A24 just south of where the D2 ends

Gentlemen, I think we have found a lost major arterial road that would have replaced the A24, leaving the A24 south of Morden then continuing along Lower Morden Lane, Green Lane, Kingshill Ave, South Lane, Sheephouse Way, Knollmead, Jubilee Way, Chantry Rd, Pear Tree Close, Gilders Road & green Lane, then along Leatherhead Road to rejoin the A24 at the Leatherhead bypass
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Post by superbfc »

wow, truly amazing! But it's incredibly friendly with the A3! A bit like how the A5 and A6 "cannon" in St Albans I suppose, or used to at least.
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Post by Truvelo »

This wouldn't have anything to do with Merantum Way would it, as discussed recently in another thread?
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So near and yet so far

Post by Brian_A3 »

Blimey - A road I have ventured down many a time in my youth. My football team (between 8 and 10 years old!) played at Knollmead school. You can see the buildings and playground just to the south west of the bridge in question.

Can't say I ever noticed it when I was a kid. I may pop down and get some photos if I get a chance at the weekend.
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Re: So near and yet so far

Post by superbfc »

Brian_A3 wrote:Can't say I ever noticed it when I was a kid.
Lots of exciting things fall into that category!
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Post by Truvelo »

this and click on the map at the bottom of the page.
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Post by A303Paul »

Truvelo wrote:this and click on the map at the bottom of the page.
Nice theory but the "A24 arterial" components were built in the '20s and '30s long before the Abercrombie 1944 plan, which had a habit of finding a wide road on the map and incorporating it into one of the radials. (eg Kings Avenue in Clapham being proposed for the Brighton Radial (no.9)). By 1944 the A24 arterial route was already dead.

PS merantun way was thought up 50-60 years after this and was a railway in the 1930s.
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Post by Paul »

A303Paul wrote:Gentlemen, I think we have found a lost major arterial road that would have replaced the A24, leaving the A24 south of Morden then continuing along Lower Morden Lane, Green Lane, Kingshill Ave, South Lane, Sheephouse Way, Knollmead, Jubilee Way, Chantry Rd, Pear Tree Close, Gilders Road & green Lane, then along Leatherhead Road to rejoin the A24 at the Leatherhead bypass
And now, in colour! :D
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Post by Sunil_of_Yoxley »

The alignment Bridge Road, Moor Lane, B284 Chessington Road is also mostly dual, and almost makes it to the modern A3. And Ruxley Road just to the north is also dual.
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Post by Truvelo »

Sunil_of_Yoxley wrote:The alignment Bridge Road, Moor Lane, B284 Chessington Road is also mostly dual, and almost makes it to the modern A3. And Ruxley Road just to the north is also dual.
That section of Chessington Road was only dualled a couple of years ago :)
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Post by Sunil_of_Yoxley »

Truvelo wrote:
Sunil_of_Yoxley wrote:The alignment Bridge Road, Moor Lane, B284 Chessington Road is also mostly dual, and almost makes it to the modern A3. And Ruxley Road just to the north is also dual.
That section of Chessington Road was only dualled a couple of years ago :)
Ah, but what about the other roads I mentioned?
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Post by Chris5156 »

A303Paul wrote:
Truvelo wrote:this and click on the map at the bottom of the page.
Nice theory but the "A24 arterial" components were built in the '20s and '30s long before the Abercrombie 1944 plan, which had a habit of finding a wide road on the map and incorporating it into one of the radials. (eg Kings Avenue in Clapham being proposed for the Brighton Radial (no.9)). By 1944 the A24 arterial route was already dead.
But evidently it wasn't, as Abercrombie incorporated it into his plan. The map shows it quite clearly, though it gets tangled with the Kingston Bypass to some extent.

If it was dead by 1944, and Abercrombie didn't resurrect it, then what's the line on the plan next to the Kingston Bypass all about?
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Post by Big Nick »

Just one question springs to my mind right now...

Why is there a large green gap between Angus Close and Derek Way in West Ewell?

Looks to me as if space was kept for a future build of the road which didn't involve Gilders Road and the residential area. Or is it something more practical such as a flood area for a stream or canal?
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