A1087

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A1087
Location Map
Cameraicon.png View gallery (2)
From:  Beltonford (NT644777)
To:  Broxburn (NT698765)
Via:  Dunbar
Distance:  4.5 miles (7.2 km)
Meets:  A199, A1
Former Number(s):  B1345, A1
Highway Authorities

East Lothian

Traditional Counties

East Lothian

Route outline (key)
A1087 Beltonford - Broxburn

Route

From a modern map it would seem that the A1087 is a renumbering of the A1 as it has bypassed Dunbar, but this is not so. Old maps show the forerunner of the A1 passing well south of the town on virtually the present line.

The A1 was thus always the avoiding road with the A1087 (renumbered from B1345 in the late 1920s) the loop through the town, the two meeting at either end. As the A199 has been extended eastwards with the construction of the A1 Expressway, it is now on the former rather than the latter road that the A1087 has its western end at the Beltonford roundabout, named after a local farm. It is in East Lothian throughout.

Beltonford - Broxburn

Travelling east from Beltonford, our road passes through flat farmland before entering the village of West Barns, now virtually attached to Dunbar. A road on the left goes to the John Muir Country Park, named after the most famous local inhabitant, who emigrated to the USA where he was greatly influential in the development of National Parks. Shortly after on the right is the original northern end of the B6370, which used to lead to Stenton via a crossroads with the A1, but following that road's dualling past Dunbar has been reduced to only a short cul-de-sac in the built-up area. (The B6370 now ends at the Thistly Cross roundabout on the A1, where the A199 also ends.)

The next district is Belhaven, famous for beer. A brewery was opened here in 1719, the company remaining independent until 2005 when it was taken over by Greene King. The original site is still in use, but most production is at a trading estate elsewhere in the town. Belhaven is also famous for the sands of that name, a huge beach which is part of the country park.

A1087 High Street, Dunbar

The road now runs through a built-up area of no real distinction until it comes to a T junction halfway along Dunbar High Street, impressively wide and straight, where we turn right and head southwards. After a gyratory scheme, with a road to the station on the ECML, the A1087 now heads southeast and soon reaches open country. There is a final settlement, the few houses of the much-less-than-a-village of Broxburn, where the road bends sharply left. This is the old eastern end of the A1087 where it used to end on the A1; it's fairly obvious that this used to be a T-junction. We then follow the old A1 over the ECML to reach a roundabout giving access to the huge cement works which dominates views over a large area. The old A1 also turns off here but we cut the corner to reach the present route of that road, which is on a long stretch of D2.

History
Lesson
The junction with the A1 is very close to the site of the Battle of Dunbar on 3 September 1650, which was part of the Third English Civil War. The English Parliamentary forces under Oliver Cromwell defeated a Scottish army commanded by David Leslie which was loyal to King Charles II, who had been proclaimed King in Scotland on 5 February 1649; he didn't become King of England until 1660.

Original Author(s): Ian198



A1087
JunctionsBroxburn Junction
RoadsEast Lothian Coastal Trail
PlacesDunbar
Related Pictures
View gallery (2)
A1087 heading towards roundabout and A199 - Geograph - 1706884.jpgHigh Street, Dunbar - Geograph - 685243.jpg
Other nearby roads
DunbarA199 • B1345 (Dunbar) • B6370 • East Lothian Coastal Trail • East Lothian Hillfoots Trail • East Lothian Saltire Trail
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